Dry Ice Manufacturer & Dry Ice Supplier Western Pennsylvania

Dry Ice is the solid form of carbon dioxide gas (CO2); the same gas we exhale when we breathe. It is much denser and colder than traditional ice made from water (H2O).

The temperature of dry ice is -109.3 °F (-78.5 °C) Traditional or water ice is 32 °F (0 °C). Dry ice does not melt like traditional ice (hence the term “dry”), it sublimates. Sublimation is when a solid turns into a gas.

The approximate rate of sublimation for dry ice is 10 pounds every 24-hours in a standard insulated container. Typically the more dry ice you have stored in your container, the longer it will last (this varies on the density and type of dry ice). Plan on picking up your dry ice as close to the time you will need it for your specific application.

For example: traveling a long distance in a vehicle with food items that you intend to keep cold or frozen.

Production of Dry Ice:

Greco Gas produces dry ice in-house and in various forms. With our new state-of-the-art dry ice manufacturing machines, we are able to create pellets, rice, and snow dry ice in small or large quantities. Specially made insulated bins are available for rent or purchase for industrial or food applications. The bins have a capacity to hold up to 500 pounds of dry ice.

For large-volume quantity purchases, contact us directly for further details.

Pellets are the most common form of dry ice that we produce, and are sold in 3 different sizes:

  • 3mm. (1/8in. diameter) (Rice-Dry Ice)
  • 10mm. (3/8in. diameter)
  • 16mm. (5/8in. diameter)

The most common size stocked in our branches is 16mm or 5/8”. The pellets resemble small white chalk-sticks and are roughly 2-3 inches in length.

 Tips When Buying Dry Ice:

  • Pick up dry ice as close as possible to the time needed
  • 5 pounds is the minimum purchase amount (larger volumes are available - 500 lbs. or greater)
  • Dry Ice sublimates approximately at 5-10% or 5-10lbs. every 24 hours.
  • Carry it in a well-insulated container such as a cooler or ice chest.
  • To keep foods  frozen, place dry ice on top of the food in a cooler
  • To keep foods cold, place dry ice on the bottom of the cooler, cover with regular water ice and place food on top.
  • To prevent freezer burn, separate the food from dry ice. Never have the dry ice directly touching the food item.

Common Applications of Dry Ice:

Commonly used as a refrigerant, which qualifies it as ideal for various applications like biological sample transport,  medical or scientific research, keeping perishables fresh or frozen, shipping or transporting food or medicine, educational experiments, Halloween experiments, power outages, fixing a car dent, shrinking metal parts food processing & storage, power outages. It also is used for producing a gas that appears like smoke for entertainment, theatrical, musical performances. It is also used in industrial applications for shrinking different types of metals or for non-abrasive and non-toxic cleaning purposes. Dry Ice is often used in high pressure blasting to remove graffiti, paint, varnish, adhesives, etc., or any type of material which reacts strongly to differences in temperature.

Making Fog with Dry Ice:

It you are interested in making fog for science projects or experiments, or for celebrating Halloween please see the following suggestions:

To make fog, add dry ice to hot water; 1 gallon of water for every 2-4 lbs. of dry ice. The variables of fog are the water temperature and the surface area of the dry ice. The smaller the size of dry ice pieces, the more fog; the higher the temperature of the water, the more fog.

When placed in water, the approximate sublimation times depend on the size of the dry ice and the temperature of the water.

Special Brews for Halloween:

  • Jack-O-Lanterns: 3-5 lb. – Approximately up to 1 hour
  • Swimming Pool:  50 lb. – Approximately up to 1-2 hours  
  • Witch’s Pot 5-15 lb. – Approximately up to 1 hour
  • when the water temperature drops below 40°F, the fog may cease being produced.

Safety Warnings for Dry Ice:

  • Avoid storing dry ice in an air-tight container without the proper ventilation; the carbon dioxide gas is constantly sublimating, and intern expanding and will potentially cause any airtight container to explode.
  • Avoid entering closed storage areas that have stored dry ice, or are presently storing dry ice before airing the space out completely. The sublimated CO2 gas will sink to the low areas and replace oxygenated air. It can be an asphyxiation hazard.
  • Avoid storing dry ice in your refrigerator freezer if it is running. The extremely cold temperature will cause your thermostat to turn off and therefore shutdown your freezer.
  • Note: If your refrigerator/freezer breaks down or the power goes out, dry ice can be beneficial by helping to keep things frozen in an emergency. It is safe to place dry ice in your refrigerator only when the unit is completely turned off/power is out. Contact us with any questions.
  • Avoid handling dry ice without the proper protection for your hands; gloves must be worn at all times when handling this product. Do not allow dry ice to come in contact with bear skin; there is risk of severe burns. Please keep out of the reach of children or minors.

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